This is stuff I like.

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Jul 6

Dear Luka, would you please wax passionate about Utena? I've watched the show and the movie and I liked it okay, but I just feel like there wasn't something I wasn't /getting/ about it. The feeling that there was more there than my puny brain could comprehend. D'you think you might be able to tell me what I'm missing out on?

Anonymous

vastderp:

oh don’t mind if i motherfucking do!

(i am going to be talking about sexual abuse here, so step lively if you’re sensitive to that topic. i am also going to give away the big secret at the heart of the series)

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I’ve thought a LOT about this show over the years, and this might be the most solid interpretation I’ve read yet.

Jul 1

roachpatrol:

archiemcphee:

These beguiling geometric figures are the work of Scotland-based laser physicist-turned-artist Tom Beddard, aka subBlue. Although it looks like you could reach out and touch them, they’re three-dimensional models digitally rendered by Beddard’s formulaic methods. Beddard calls them Fabergé Fractals because their incredibly intricate and dazzling patterns are ornate like jewel-encrusted Fabergé eggs.

Beddard describes his work:

"The 3D fractals are generated by iterative formulas whereby the output of one iteration forms the input for the next. The formulas effectively fold, scale, rotate or flip space. They are truly fractal in the fact that more and more detail can be revealed the closer to the surface you travel.

"The fascinating aspect is where combinations of parameters can combine to create structural ‘resonances’ of extraordinary detail and beauty—sometimes naturally organic and other times perfectly geometric. But then like a chaotic system it can completely disappear with the smallest perturbation."

Visit the subBlue website to check out more of Tom Beddard’s awesome geometric artwork.

[via My Modern Metropolis]

these are beautiful, but they make me afraid

Jul 1

(Source: oatmeal)

Jul 1

fenrislorsrai:

captoring:

raisehelia:

Don’t say “I’m not like other girls.”

Be like other girls and meld with other girls and become one with the glorious mass of writhing womanhood that will roll over the towns and the cities and devour all space and all time.

i like how our response to day-to-day shitty events of misogyny/homophobia/etc has officially become this brand of nightmarish surrealism and it genuinely makes me feel better

Katamary the patriarchy!

roachpatrol:

nadiezda:

Sailor moon a la mexicana :p

Lo hice por diversión, talvez haga a las demás?

this is the only possible culture tuxedo mask actually looks hot in

Whatever you now find weird, ugly, uncomfortable and nasty about a new medium will surely become its signature. CD distortion, the jitteriness of digital video, the crap sound of 8-bit - all of these will be cherished and emulated as soon as they can be avoided. It’s the sound of failure: so much modern art is the sound of things going out of control, of a medium pushing to its limits and breaking apart. The distorted guitar sound is the sound of something too loud for the medium supposed to carry it. The blues singer with the cracked voice is the sound of an emotional cry too powerful for the throat that releases it. The excitement of grainy film, of bleached-out black and white, is the excitement of witnessing events too momentous for the medium assigned to record them.

- Brian Eno, A Year With Swollen Appendices  (via gllob)

(Source: volumexii)

How about Latula in pallet 9?

tentacuddles:

here’s hoping tumblr doesn’t ruin this.

“Malfoy bought the whole team brand-new Nimbus Cleansweeps!” Ron said, like a poor person. “That’s not fair!”

“Everything that is possible is fair,” Harry reminded him gently. “If he is able to purchase better equipment, that is his right as an individual. How is Draco’s superior purchasing ability qualitatively different from my superior Snitch-catching ability?”

“I guess it isn’t,” Ron said crossly.

Harry laughed, cool and remote, like if a mountain were to laugh.

“Someday you’ll understand, Ron.”

- Ayn Rand’s Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone (Mallory Ortberg)

(Source: mostsmartest)

Toad Words

jumpingjacktrash:

the-real-seebs:

ursulavernon:

            Frogs fall out of my mouth when I talk. Toads, too.

            It used to be a problem.

            There was an incident when I was young and cross and fed up parental expectations. My sister, who is the Good One, has gold fall from her lips, and since I could not be her, I had to go a different way.

            So I got frogs. It happens.

            “You’ll grow into it,” the fairy godmother said. “Some curses have cloth-of-gold linings.” She considered this, and her finger drifted to her lower lip, the way it did when she was forgetting things. “Mind you, some curses just grind you down and leave you broken. Some blessings do that too, though. Hmm. What was I saying?”

            I spent a lot of time not talking. I got a slate and wrote things down. It was hard at first, but I hated to drop the frogs in the middle of the road. They got hit by cars, or dried out, miles away from their damp little homes.

            Toads were easier. Toads are tough. After awhile, I learned to feel when a word was a toad and not a frog. I could roll the word around on my tongue and get the flavor before I spoke it. Toad words were drier. Desiccated is a toad word. So is crisp and crisis and obligation. So are elegant and matchstick.

            Frog words were a bit more varied. Murky. Purple. Swinging. Jazz.

I practiced in the field behind the house, speaking words over and over, sending small creatures hopping into the evening.  I learned to speak some words as either toads or frogs. It’s all in the delivery.

            Love is a frog word, if spoken earnestly, and a toad word if spoken sarcastically. Frogs are not good at sarcasm.

            Toads are masters of it.

            I learned one day that the amphibians are going extinct all over the world, that some of them are vanishing. You go to ponds that should be full of frogs and find them silent. There are a hundred things responsible—fungus and pesticides and acid rain.

            When I heard this, I cried “What!?” so loudly that an adult African bullfrog fell from my lips and I had to catch it. It weighed as much as a small cat. I took it to the pet store and spun them a lie in writing about my cousin going off to college and leaving the frog behind.

            I brooded about frogs for weeks after that, and then eventually, I decided to do something about it.

            I cannot fix the things that kill them. It would take an army of fairy godmothers, and mine retired long ago. Now she goes on long cruises and spreads her wings out across the deck chairs.

            But I can make more.

            I had to get a field guide at first. It was a long process. Say a word and catch it, check the field marks. Most words turn to bronze frogs if I am not paying attention.

            Poison arrow frogs make my lips go numb. I can only do a few of those a day. I go through a lot of chapstick.  

            It is a holding action I am fighting, nothing more. I go to vernal pools and whisper sonnets that turn into wood frogs. I say the words squeak and squill and spring peepers skitter away into the trees. They begin singing almost the moment they emerge.

            I read long legal documents to a growing audience of Fowler’s toads, who blink their goggling eyes up at me. (I wish I could do salamanders. I would read Clive Barker novels aloud and seed the streams with efts and hellbenders. I would fly to Mexico and read love poems in another language to restore the axolotl. Alas, it’s frogs and toads and nothing more. We make do.)

            The woods behind my house are full of singing. The neighbors either learn to love it or move away.

            My sister—the one who speaks gold and diamonds—funds my travels. She speaks less than I do, but for me and my amphibian friends, she will vomit rubies and sapphires. I am grateful.

            I am practicing reading modernist revolutionary poetry aloud. My accent is atrocious. Still, a day will come when the Panamanian golden frog will tumble from my lips, and I will catch it and hold it, and whatever word I spoke, I’ll say again and again, until I stand at the center of a sea of yellow skins, and make from my curse at last a cloth of gold.

Terri Windling posted recently about the old fairy tale of frogs falling from a girl’s lips, and I started thinking about what I’d do if that happened to me, and…well…

!.

You know how if you go through years and years of “best science fiction short stories”, every so often you find some short story you’ve never heard of before, but it’s just amazing and brilliant and leaves you wondering why you never read stories with that plot before? This is one of those.

Seriously, wow.

this made me smile.

i’m still smiling.

bequilles:

prettylittle-timebomb:

So I have always been extremely embarrassed that my left ear is deaf. I tried to hide it in every way possible. It made me feel broken and useless, especially listening and playing music. My original idea was to put music notes behind my ear, but for some reason the idea just didn’t feel quite right considering I couldn’t hear said music. I came up with the mute symbol idea because lately I have learned to embrace my deafness. I tend to joke around that my left ear is like my mute button when I want to ignore someone. Now I am no longer ashamed and find strength in the humor of my tattoo.

That is pretty great.

bequilles:

prettylittle-timebomb:

So I have always been extremely embarrassed that my left ear is deaf. I tried to hide it in every way possible. It made me feel broken and useless, especially listening and playing music. My original idea was to put music notes behind my ear, but for some reason the idea just didn’t feel quite right considering I couldn’t hear said music. I came up with the mute symbol idea because lately I have learned to embrace my deafness. I tend to joke around that my left ear is like my mute button when I want to ignore someone. Now I am no longer ashamed and find strength in the humor of my tattoo.

That is pretty great.